A FRAMEWORK FOR MARlNE AND ESTUARINE MODEL SPECIFICATION IN THE UK
Report No FR0374

Mar 1993

SUMMARY

I BENEFITS

Improvement of the way in which marine and estuarine water quality modelling work is carried out by or on behalf of members of the Foundation for Water Research (FWR).

II OBJECTIVES

The object of the work was to draw up a framework of guidelines to assist members of the FWR in the task of specifying marine and estuarine water quality models.

III REASONS

Marine and estuarine water quality models are often required by dischargers to assist them in their discussions with the National Rivers Authority (NRA) in applications for consent to discharge. The NRA itself requires models to assist it in planning and controlling water quality of coastal waters and estuaries. The field of marine and estuarine water quality modelling is highly specialised, so that it is very possible that this area of work will be new to those who are called on to specify it. They may therefore need guidance.

IV CONCLUSIONS

No single blueprint can be provided for the specification of marine and estuarine models in the United Kingdom. Rather than specifying a standardised marine or estuarine model, it is better to specify standards for modelling. It is important to choose the right type and complexity of model to be sure that the right problem is being studied. There should be a continuous process of consultation between discharger and regulator beginning at the earliest stage in a modelling study.

V RECOMMENDATIONS

The person charged with specifying marine or estuarine modelling studies should take note of the general points made in the report, especially those emphasising the importance of consultation, the staging of a study and the worth of different contractual arrangements. It is to be hoped that the discussion of the technical problems and consideration of the scope of the models will be found useful, but the reader should consult the scientific literature for greater detail or seek specific technical advice. The Appendix, which provides a sample of an ambitious specification, should be read only as a `checklist'; it would require considerable refinement for any given application.

Vl RESUME OF CONTENTS

The introduction describes the purpose and context of the report, and discusses the relationship between customer, user and supplier of models. Then there is a section about the scope of the model: the questions to be answered and the technical problem of answering them. A third section considers aspects of project management and is followed by a brief concluding section.

Copies of the Report are available from FWR, price 25.00 less 20% to FWR Members